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Nottingham’s Alex Foss wins major grant award for i-BiT ‘lazy eye’ study

A collaboration between a multi-disciplinary team from Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and The University of Nottingham has been awarded a prestigious NIHR invention for innovation (i4i) grant to study an innovative approach for the treatment of amblyopia or ‘lazy eye’.

The usual treatment for this condition is to wear a patch over the non-amblyopic or ‘good eye’ for several hours a day, over a number of months. The aim of the research is to provide a new way to treat amblyopia that young children will find interesting and will engage with, particularly as one of the main problems in treating this condition is non compliance with many children refusing to wear a patch for the prescribed time which leads to failure of the treatment.

Early data shows  encouraging outcomes, with increases in vision in some children after only six weeks of treatment

Early data shows encouraging outcomes, with increases in vision in some children after only six weeks of treatment

The team, led by Mr Alexander Foss, and includes orthoptists, ophthalmologists and IT technologists who have developed a virtual reality based system which involves children playing special video games and watching DVDs. The interactive binocular treatment system (I-BiT™) uses specially configured software and shutter glasses to stimulate the amblyopic eye; both eyes receive an image simultaneously but the brain is forced to use the ‘lazy’ eye in order to watch the DVD or play the game properly.

Early clinical trial data has shown encouraging outcomes with some children experiencing increases in vision after only six weeks of treatment with the new system and without the use of patching.

Read more about the i-BiT study in our Featured Innovations section

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